Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils

Mike Everhart mike at oceansofkansas.com
Wed Nov 14 17:54:18 GMT 2012


I'd certainly agree with Thomas Holtz in regard to including /Mosasaurus 
hoffmani/...  recognition of it's relationship to living animals 
literally forced Cuvier to "invent" the concept of extinction.

Mike Everhart
Adjunct Curator of Paleontology
Sternberg Museum of Natural History
Fort Hays State University, Hays, KS
www.oceansofkansas.com

> I would say that the Great Animal of Maastricht (Mosasaurus hoffmani) as the first clues for a vanished Age of Reptiles, and the
> type specimen of Homo neanderthalensis for the existence of fossil non-sapiens humans.
>
> More parochially, and more recently in terms of scientific contributions, the discovery of Sinosauropteryx prima was the first
> fossil to demonstrate the presence of feathers/feather homologues in dinosaurs well basal to Archaeopteryx, and kicked off the
> current era of dinosaurian studies.
>
>
>
> Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> Email: tholtz at umd.edu	Phone: 301-405-4084
> Office: Centreville 1216			
> Senior Lecturer, Vertebrate Paleontology
> Dept. of Geology, University of Maryland
> http://www.geol.umd.edu/~tholtz/
> Fax: 301-314-9661		
>
> Faculty Director, Science & Global Change Program, College Park Scholars
> http://www.geol.umd.edu/sgc
> Fax: 301-314-9843
>
> Mailing Address:	Thomas R. Holtz, Jr.
> 			Department of Geology
> 			Building 237, Room 1117
> 			University of Maryland
> 			College Park, MD 20742 USA
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: paleonet-bounces at nhm.ac.uk [mailto:paleonet-bounces at nhm.ac.uk] On Behalf Of bjoern kroeger
>> Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 10:11 AM
>> To: PaleoNet
>> Subject: Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils
>>
>> Hello PaleoNet,
>>
>> I am preparing a paleontological museum educational project on the history of live (very general) and for that purpose would like
> to
>> know, which fossils  could be considered by you as the most important / most iconic for our past & current understanding of
> evolution
>> and the history of life.
>>
>> I think of the Archeopteryx as an icon for a "missing link", the "Ohio animal" as an icon for extinction.
>>
>> I also have fossils in mind, that are iconic for specific events, such as Anomalocaris for the Cambrian explosion.
>>
>> I don't have necessarily individual fossils in mind, but also suite's like Trueman's Gryphaea and Brinkmann's Kosmoceras for
> gradualism
>> Willimsons Turkana molluscs for punctualism (but see Van Bocxlaer et al. 2007) etc.
>>
>> Suggestions are welcome! (Probably there is already a compilation published somewhere?)
>>
>> Thank you,
>> Björn Kröger
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ----------------------
>>   ~ ~ ~   >0<>
>> Dr. Björn Kröger
>> Museum für Naturkunde
>> Invalidenstr. 43
>> D-10115 Berlin
>> Germany
>> http://www.tiefes-leben.de
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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