Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils

Mark Storaasli mstoraasli at gmail.com
Thu Nov 15 03:33:56 GMT 2012


Don't forget the massive 'original microbial mat'  and the split-off of
a pre-poriferan ancestor of 'Sponge-Bob Squarepants' ...aarrhhhh!
Then the first marine fungi, lichens, and other ilk, before the first
expected 'Bilaterian' ...then don't forget Rhynia and the tree ferns.
the origin of insecta and the cycads, palms, sequoias, and birch
trees...Did I say "Rhynia"?


On Wed, Nov 14, 2012 at 12:07 PM, Christian Emig <brachnet at aliceadsl.fr>wrote:

> About Lingula please read at least
> http://paleopolis.rediris.es/cg/CG2003_L01_CCE/index.html !!
>
>
> Dr. Christian Emig
> Directeur de Recherches Honoraire au CNRS
>
> BrachNet
> 20 Rue Chaix
> F - 13007 Marseille
> (France)
>
> http://paleopolis.rediris.es/Phoronida/EMIG/
> ----------------------------------------------------
> http://emig.free.fr/Groupe-EMIG.htm
> -------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Le 14 nov. 2012 à 16:40, Oliver Rauhut a écrit :
>
> Lingula or the horseshoe crabs as classic examples of "living fossils",
> groups that (apparently) haven't changed for eons.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Oliver
> ______________________________
> Dr. Oliver Rauhut
> Curator for Amphibians, Reptiles, and Birds
> Bayerische Staatssammlung für Paläontologie und Geologie
> Richard-Wagner-Strasse 10
> D-80333 München
> Germany
> email: o.rauhut at lrz.uni-muenchen.de
>          owmrauhut at hotmail.com
>
>
>
> > From: bk at tiefes-leben.de
> > Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 16:10:34 +0100
> > To: paleonet at nhm.ac.uk
> > Subject: Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils
> >
> > Hello PaleoNet,
> >
> > I am preparing a paleontological museum educational project on the
> history of live (very general) and for that purpose would like to know,
> which fossils could be considered by you as the most important / most
> iconic for our past & current understanding of evolution and the history of
> life.
> >
> > I think of the Archeopteryx as an icon for a "missing link", the "Ohio
> animal" as an icon for extinction.
> >
> > I also have fossils in mind, that are iconic for specific events, such
> as Anomalocaris for the Cambrian explosion.
> >
> > I don't have necessarily individual fossils in mind, but also suite's
> like Trueman's Gryphaea and Brinkmann's Kosmoceras for gradualism
> Willimsons Turkana molluscs for punctualism (but see Van Bocxlaer et al.
> 2007) etc.
> >
> > Suggestions are welcome! (Probably there is already a compilation
> published somewhere?)
> >
> > Thank you,
> > Björn Kröger
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ----------------------
> > ~ ~ ~ >0<>
> > Dr. Björn Kröger
> > Museum für Naturkunde
> > Invalidenstr. 43
> > D-10115 Berlin
> > Germany
> > http://www.tiefes-leben.de
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
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> > Paleonet at nhm.ac.uk
> > http://mailman.nhm.ac.uk/mailman/listinfo/paleonet
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