Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils

Jere H. Lipps jlipps at berkeley.edu
Thu Nov 15 13:14:29 GMT 2012


Hi John:   As you know, we don't have any of 
those around California but a couple would be 
nice to have at the Cooper Center to show our 
visitors.  Took me years to get to and find a 
spot for them on the east coast.  We appreciate your offer.    Jere.

At 09:55 AM 11/14/2012 Wednesday, Pojeta, John wrote:
>Content-Language: en-US
>Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
> 
>boundary="_000_90C44A9B052D1340A21CB077404B094A0AE163D169SIMSEV04USSIN_"
>
>Bjorn,
>
>If you should need specimens of Limulis, I have 
>dozens of molts collected from Northport, Long Island, New York.
>
>Cheers,
>John
>
><mailto:pojetaj at si.edu>pojetaj at si.edu
>
>
>From: paleonet-bounces at nhm.ac.uk 
>[mailto:paleonet-bounces at nhm.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Hasiotis, Stephen Tom
>Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 12:30 PM
>To: Greg Burzynski; PaleoNet
>Subject: Re: Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils
>
>Bjorn,
>
>I think horseshoe crabs make a great iconic 
>example of living fossils based on the relative 
>consistency of the body plan since and trackway 
>patterns since the late Paleozoic.
>
>These animals are also very relevant to society 
>today as they are a food supply for migratory 
>birds, and that we use them for bait, 
>fertilizer, and in pharmaceutical industry using 
>their blood, particularly the white blood cells, 
>to screen for endotoxins produced by gram-negative bacteria.
>
>Inclusion of such an animal, with its body and 
>trace fossil records and importance to human 
>health, goes a long way to educate people to the 
>importance of paleontology, evolution, the 
>history of life and its direct relevance to society.
>
>Thanks for asking,
>Steve
>
>***************************************
>Stephen T. Hasiotis, Ph.D.
>Professor of Geology
>Coeditor of PALAIOS, 
><http://www.paleo.ku.edu/palaios>www.paleo.ku.edu/palaios
>The University of Kansas Department of Geology
>1475 Jayhawk Blvd., rm. 120
>Lindley Hall
>Lawrence, KS 66045-7594
>Office: 785-864-4941
>Fax:     785-864-5276
><mailto:hasiotis at ku.edu>hasiotis at ku.edu
>KU Ichnology:  <http://web.ku.edu/~hasiotis/>http://web.ku.edu/~hasiotis/
>Manuscript submission: 
><http://sepm-palaios.allentrack.net/>http://sepm-palaios.allentrack.net/
>****************************************
>
>From: Greg Burzynski <<mailto:paleogreg at yahoo.com>paleogreg at yahoo.com>
>Reply-To: Greg Burzynski 
><<mailto:paleogreg at yahoo.com>paleogreg at yahoo.com>, 
>PaleoNet <<mailto:paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>
>Date: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 11:12 AM
>To: PaleoNet <<mailto:paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>
>Subject: Re: Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils
>
>I would vote for Dickinsonia, Charnia or Charniodiscus from the Ediacaran
>
>
>Cheers,
>Greg
>********************************
>Gregory M. Burzynski
>Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering
>Queen's University
>Kingston, ON
>K7M 1B6
>Canada
>
>Office: Bruce Wing 329
>
>
>Phone: 613-888-2145
>E-mail: <mailto:paleogreg at yahoo.com>paleogreg at yahoo.com
>
>From: Peter Moon <<mailto:pmoon1 at gmail.com>pmoon1 at gmail.com>
>To: PaleoNet <<mailto:paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>
>Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2012 11:08 AM
>Subject: Re: Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils
>
>
>Stromatolites, I guess
>
>Peter Moon, Ph.D.
>Editor at Large
>São Paulo-SP
>Brazil
>
>
>Em 14/11/2012, às 14:00, Marc Srour 
><<mailto:marcsrour at gmail.com>marcsrour at gmail.com> escreveu:
>My high school students always find the 
>ecological and taxonomic diversity of trilobites 
>fascinating, it drives home the fact that 
>fossils aren't just "dead organisms", they're 
>representatives of now-extinct ecologies that 
>are nonetheless similar to modern ones even if the organisms were different.
>
>Marc
>
> > From: <mailto:bk at tiefes-leben.de>bk at tiefes-leben.de
> > Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 16:10:34 +0100
> > To: <mailto:paleonet at nhm.ac.uk>paleonet at nhm.ac.uk
> > Subject: Paleonet: most iconic / most important fossils
> >
> > Hello PaleoNet,
> >
> > I am preparing a paleontological museum 
> educational project on the history of live 
> (very general) and for that purpose would like 
> to know, which fossils could be considered by 
> you as the most important / most iconic for our 
> past & current understanding of evolution and the history of life.
> >
> > I think of the Archeopteryx as an icon for a 
> "missing link", the "Ohio animal" as an icon for extinction.
> >
> > I also have fossils in mind, that are iconic 
> for specific events, such as Anomalocaris for the Cambrian explosion.
> >
> > I don't have necessarily individual fossils 
> in mind, but also suite's like Trueman's 
> Gryphaea and Brinkmann's Kosmoceras for 
> gradualism Willimsons Turkana molluscs for 
> punctualism (but see Van Bocxlaer et al. 2007) etc.
> >
> > Suggestions are welcome! (Probably there is 
> already a compilation published somewhere?)
> >
> > Thank you,
> > Björn Kröger
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ----------------------
> > ~ ~ ~ >0<>
> > Dr. Björn Kröger
> > Museum für Naturkunde
> > Invalidenstr. 43
> > D-10115 Berlin
> > Germany
> > <http://www.tiefes-leben.de/>http://www.tiefes-leben.de
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
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>
>
>
>
>--
>Arthropodologist, Palaeontologist
>Enalia Physis Environmental Research Center, Cyprus
><http://enaliaphysis.org.cy/?page_id=252>http://enaliaphysis.org.cy/?page_id=252
>Blogger of <http://bioteaching.wordpress.com/>Teaching Biology.
>
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