Paleonet: Paleonet mailing list

Paul inselberg at cox.net
Mon Nov 19 03:04:19 GMT 2012


Dr. Christian Emig wrote:

 >The tendency to use email addresses with
 >anonymous IP (yahoo, gmail, hotmail , etc.)
 >becomes aa problem to identify the scientist
 >and his true identity. I disagree with,
 >especially as co-editor of a scientific journal
 >because this is a good opportunity for
 >fraudulent relationships. Examples exist -
 >see Carnets de Géologie.
 >...text omitted...
 >nevertheless why she do not use the
 >professional address given by the institute:
 >romeroic at si.edu

The reason that I use my personal address is
that PaleoNet archives are open to the public
and web crawlers that collect email addresses.
I found that posting to such lists increases
exponentially the amount of junk mail that get
sent to emails used on these mailing lists. As a
result, I only use an email address that is solely
dedicated to posting to such lists so all of the
junk mail generated by posting to public mailing
lists with open archives gets dumped in one email
account and does not overwhelm my work
address.

In other cases, given the various rules, regulations,
limitations, and restrictions about what is official
use of email, using a person's office / professional
email address for Paleonet is not always deemed
appropriate by either a person's boss or employer.
Thus, some people neither want nor need the
hassle of justifying why using their official email
to subscribe to a paleontology list is a part of their
official duties. it is a lot simpler and far less
expensive to use a free gmail, yahoo, or hotmail
account.

Besides, this morning I received a PDF reprint
of a peer-reviewed paper from the Journal of
Island & Coastal Archaeology (Taylor & Francis
Group, LLC) and the email that is listed for the
paper's author is a yahoo email address.
Similarly, the Geological Society of America's
(GSA) meetings abstracts regularly have yahoo,
gmail, hotmail, and so forth email addresses
for authors. For example, in a search of the
GSA meeting abstract database, I got 3759 hits
for yahoo.com and 7721 hits for gmail.com for
the period 2001 to 2012. Also, a search of
the GSA database for their peer-reviewed
published found dozens of citations for peer-
reviewed papers in which the authors used
either yahoo.com or gmail.com email addresses.
It is obvious that there are prominent scientific
publishers that disagree with the alleged
dangers of yahoo, gmail, and hotmail. If such
accounts are acceptable as email addresses by
the GSA, Taylor & Francis Group, and other
publishers for peer-reviewed literature, they
should be good enough for this list. As far as
I am concerned the type of email address
that a person wants to use is his or her
decision only. It is certainly nothing that this
list should mandate.

Just My Thoughts,

Paul

Paul V. Heinrich
9887 Kinglet Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70803












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