Paleonet: Teaching: making paleo relevant

Paula M. Mikkelsen pmm37 at cornell.edu
Mon Feb 4 13:57:59 GMT 2013


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Paula Mikkelsen
********************************************
Paula M. Mikkelsen, Ph.D.
Associate Director for Science and Director of Publications
Visiting Fellow, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University
Paleontological Research Institution
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Tel. (607) 273-6623, ext. 20
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email  pmm37 at cornell.edu
 
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-----Original Message-----
From: paleonet-bounces at nhm.ac.uk [mailto:paleonet-bounces at nhm.ac.uk] On Behalf Of Martin Farley
Sent: Sunday, February 03, 2013 6:35 PM
To: PaleoNet
Subject: Re: Paleonet: Teaching: making paleo relevant


One suggestion is to peruse the set of teaching activities on Paleontology at the Carleton College SERC website (http://serc.carleton.edu/index.html)
and see if there are some that meet your needs or inspire you to create your own. There was a workshop specifically on "Teaching Paleontology in the21st century" about 3.5 years ago. The participants contributed a wealth of activities on paleo sensu lato (e.g., some are suitable for courses like Historical Geology).

Some of how I do this is tied to my region (e.g., Quaternary climate change; sea level on the NC Coastal Plain), and some isn't (e.g., I created an exercise to show the application of relative geologic time principles based on investigations of paleoseismology along the San Andreas fault).

Some of the things I do are for lab only; others, although hands-on "lab"
exercises, I do in lecture. Depending on your class size, you might be able to do the same.


On Sun, February 3, 2013 2:15 pm, Thomas Hegna wrote:
>
> All,
>   To those of you who teach classes like Historical Geology, History 
> of the Earth, and Paleontology: how do you make connections between 
> events in the past (both in terms of mechanism and scale) and those we 
> see today? I feel like thus far in my teaching I have kept these 
> connections too general (sea-level rise, climate change, etc.) and not 
> tied it down with meaningful specifics. How do others approach this?
> Best,
> Tom
>
>
>
>
>
> ___________________________________
> Thomas A. Hegna
>
> http://wiu.academia.edu/ThomasHegna
> ___________________________________
>
> Department of Geology
> Western Illinois University
> Tillman Hall 113
> 1 University Circle
> Macomb, IL 61455
> USA
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Truly yours,

Martin Farley
mbfarley at sigmaxi.net

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