<html>This is being sent to both Paleonet and Conch-L lists, so please pardon duplication.  Other living mollusks first described from Pliocene marine fossils include the bivalves <EM>Americardia columba</EM> (Heilprin, 1886), <EM>Ensitellops elipticus</EM> and <EM>E. tabulata</EM>, Olsson and Harbison, 1953.  Gastropods from Olsson and Harbison, 1953 include <EM>Petaloconchus mcgintyi</EM>, <EM>Schwartziella floridana </EM>and <EM>Tornatina inconspicua.</EM>  Fargo <EM>in</EM> Olsson and Harbison, 1953 added <EM>Kurtziella margaritifera, Cryoturris serta, </EM>and <EM>Agathotoma coxi.</EM>  Additional species include<EM> Busycon sinistrum</EM> Hollister, 1958, <EM>Vokesimurex bellegladensis </EM>E. Vokes, 1963 and <EM>Columbella rusticoides</EM> Heilprin, 1886.  I am sure there are many others that I skipped.  These relatively young fossil species are, of course, not 'living fossils' as they are popularly known, but rather represent a normal species lifespan and good collections of fossil material.<BR><BR>Allen Aigen<BR>SeriRach@juno.com<BR><BR>-- "Pojeta, John" <POJETAJ@si.edu> wrote:<BR>
<DIV class=Section1>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial color=navy size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: navy; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">Try the bivalved snails—as I recall they were first described as fossil pelecypods.</SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial color=navy size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: navy; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> </SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial color=navy size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: navy; FONT-FAMILY: Arial">John</SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial color=navy size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: navy; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> </SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial color=navy size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: navy; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"><A href="mailto:pojetaj@si.edu">pojetaj@si.edu</A> </SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face=Arial color=navy size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: navy; FONT-FAMILY: Arial"> </SPAN></FONT></P>
<DIV>
<DIV class=MsoNormal style="TEXT-ALIGN: center" align=center><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<HR tabIndex=-1 align=center width="100%" SIZE=2>
</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<P class=MsoNormal><B><FONT face=Tahoma size=2><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma">From:</SPAN></FONT></B><FONT face=Tahoma size=2><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Tahoma"> paleonet-bounces+pojetaj=si.edu@nhm.ac.uk [mailto:paleonet-bounces+pojetaj=si.edu@nhm.ac.uk] <B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">On Behalf Of </SPAN></B>Carl Mehling<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Sent:</SPAN></B> Wednesday, March 07, 2007 9:37 AM<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">To:</SPAN></B> paleonet@nhm.ac.uk; vrtpaleo@usc.edu<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Subject:</SPAN></B> Paleonet: Known First as Fossils - Clarification</SPAN></FONT></P></DIV>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt"> </SPAN></FONT></P>
<P class=MsoNormal><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt">Hi All,<BR>Some have suggested that I look into “living fossils.” The examples I am looking for are not necessarily “living fossils.” To me, that term describes taxa whose lineages have an extremely long geological records and which persist today in basically the same form. This would be things like <I><SPAN style="FONT-STYLE: italic">Latimeria</SPAN></I>, cockroaches, <I><SPAN style="FONT-STYLE: italic">Lingula</SPAN></I>, lycopods, etc. But I am only looking for taxa that were first known as fossils and then were subsequently found extant. This would include things like the XXX known from 4 million year old fossils and then later found alive today, as well as things like coelacanths, but not things like horseshoe crabs. I also wouldn’t consider the XXX a “living fossil” because of its relatively recent oldest fossil occurrence.<BR>Best,<BR>Carl<BR><BR><BR></SPAN></FONT></P><X-SIGSEP>
<P></X-SIGSEP><FONT face="Times New Roman" size=3><SPAN style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt">Carl Mehling<BR>Fossil Amphibian, Reptile, and Bird Collections<BR>Division of Paleontology <BR>American Museum of Natural History<BR>Central Park West @79th Street<BR>New York, NY  10024<BR>(212) 769-5849<BR>Fax: (212) 769-5842<BR>cosm@amnh.org</SPAN></FONT></P></DIV></html>