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<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>Try the bivalved snails—as I recall
they were first described as fossil pelecypods.</span></font></p>

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10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'> </span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'>John</span></font></p>

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10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'> </span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=navy face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:navy'><a href="mailto:pojetaj@si.edu">pojetaj@si.edu</a>
</span></font></p>

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<p class=MsoNormal><b><font size=2 face=Tahoma><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Tahoma;font-weight:bold'>From:</span></font></b><font size=2
face=Tahoma><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Tahoma'> paleonet-bounces+pojetaj=si.edu@nhm.ac.uk
[mailto:paleonet-bounces+pojetaj=si.edu@nhm.ac.uk] <b><span style='font-weight:
bold'>On Behalf Of </span></b>Carl Mehling<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>Sent:</span></b> Wednesday, March 07, 2007
9:37 AM<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>To:</span></b> paleonet@nhm.ac.uk;
vrtpaleo@usc.edu<br>
<b><span style='font-weight:bold'>Subject:</span></b> Paleonet: Known First as
Fossils - Clarification</span></font></p>

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<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'>Hi All,<br>
Some have suggested that I look into “living fossils.” The examples
I am looking for are not necessarily “living fossils.” To me, that
term describes taxa whose lineages have an extremely long geological records
and which persist today in basically the same form. This would be things like <i><span
style='font-style:italic'>Latimeria</span></i>, cockroaches, <i><span
style='font-style:italic'>Lingula</span></i>, lycopods, etc. But I am only
looking for taxa that were first known as fossils and then were subsequently
found extant. This would include things like the XXX known from 4 million year
old fossils and then later found alive today, as well as things like
coelacanths, but not things like horseshoe crabs. I also wouldn’t
consider the XXX a “living fossil” because of its relatively recent
oldest fossil occurrence.<br>
Best,<br>
Carl<br>
<br>
<br>
</span></font></p>

<x-sigsep>

<p></x-sigsep><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:12.0pt'>Carl
Mehling<br>
Fossil Amphibian, Reptile, and Bird Collections<br>
Division of Paleontology <br>
  American Museum of Natural History<br>
 Central Park West @79th Street<br>
  New York, NY  10024<br>
(212) 769-5849<br>
Fax: (212) 769-5842<br>
cosm@amnh.org</span></font></p>

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