<div dir="ltr">
















<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'">Dear all,</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'">   My co-convener David Bottjer and myself are
writing to invite you to submit an abstract to the session <b>T.140 Evolution, Development, and Paleogenomics<i> </i></b>to be held during the Annual Meeting of the Geological Society
of America from 25-28 of September in Denver, Colorado. With recent advances in
genomics and molecular biology, the scientific landscape is ripe for combining
palaeontological approaches with these fields in interdisciplinary studies. Our
session is aimed at those who use a variety of approaches, palaeontological or
otherwise, to study evolution and development in the fossil record. The
deadline for submission is not far off, on <b>July
12 at 11:59 PM PDT</b>, so if you are interested, please considering submitting
an abstract to our session, which we think will be very exciting. A detailed
description of the session is below.</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'">Thanks for your
time, and all the best,</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'">    Jeff Thompson</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'"> </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'">Session
Description: </span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman'">Interdisciplinary
studies are providing excellent new opportunities to understand the pattern and
process of evolution. New data from molecular biology, developmental biology
and paleontology are being integrated in a “molecular paleobiological”
framework, to produce a more holistic view of evolutionary biology. Recent
advances in the understanding of Gene Regulatory Networks (GRNs) have provided
new windows into the understanding of the mechanistic underpinning of
evolution, which results in changes of organismal morphology, as observed in
the fossil record. These changes, and resulting changes in development provide
evidence that can be observed directly through the lens of the fossil record.
Evolution of developmental process, and the generation of new morphological
innovations in the fossil record, allow paleontologists to understand the
evolution of the genomic underpinning of development, known as paleogenomics. The
goal of the proposed session is to provide a venue for presentations focused on
the use of multiple types of data, developmental, genomic, and paleontological
to understand evolution, and development in the fossil record. This session
will include, though is not limited to presentations addressing new approaches
to interpreting the fossil record, through integration of fossil data with
developmental biology, molecular biology, and genomics.</span></p>

</div>