<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=us-ascii">
<meta name="Generator" content="Microsoft Word 15 (filtered medium)">
<style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:Wingdings;
        panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;}
@font-face
        {font-family:"Cambria Math";
        panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:11.0pt;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:#0563C1;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:#954F72;
        text-decoration:underline;}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal-compose;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;
        color:windowtext;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-family:"Calibri",sans-serif;}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]-->
</head>
<body lang="EN-US" link="#0563C1" vlink="#954F72">
<div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal">Can anyone speak to the posture of the hind limbs of <i>Cynognathus</i>?  I have tried to find some primary literature on this but a lot of it is difficult for me to get through our library system.  My reading is that Gregory and Camp based
 their hindlimb reconstruction on that of <i>Microgomphodon</i>.    See their reconstruction on page 541
<a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=tgVLAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA538&lpg=PA538&dq=A+reconstruction+of+the+skeleton+of+Cynognathus&source=bl&ots=TQMcryEN63&sig=9aWYg27MaIl9aOiMndleRqM8dd8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7uMC44KTdAhXNtlMKHa3QCQIQ6AEwDnoECAMQAQ#v=snippet&q=cynognathus&f=false">
here</a><o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">The only other visual reconstruction I could find is the one shown
<a href="https://www.britannica.com/animal/Cynognathus">here</a> from the American Museum of Natural History (but I am not sure what this is based on), and of course this
<a href="http://www.occc.edu/biologylabs/Documents/Evolution%20Tutorial/Transition_Mammal.htm">
one</a> (top drawing).  I assume the latter is by Scott Hartmann but all efforts to contact him have failed me.<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Does skeletal material, to accurately reconstruct the posture of the hind limbs of
<i>Cynognathus, </i>exist,<i> </i>and can someone point me to the right literature? 
<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">A challenged invertebrate guy who teaches things he clearly knows little about
<span style="font-family:Wingdings">J</span><o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Alexander Glass<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Senior Lecturer<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Co-Director of Undergraduate Studies<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences <o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Nicholas School of the Environment<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal">Duke University, Durham, NC<o:p></o:p></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><o:p> </o:p></p>
</div>
</body>
</html>